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Blue Bags Grow Better Crops...

WHY IS SULPHUR SO IMPORTANT FOR CROPS?

Just like Nitrogen, Phosphate and Potash, Sulphur plays an essential part in creating a strong, healthy and consistent yield from your arable crops.

For a long time, it’s been readily available from the atmosphere, but as Britain’s air quality is cleaned up, atmospheric Sulphur levels are falling.

Today, without supplements, many crops can become Sulphur deficient, making a big impact on performance, quality, yield and profits. Watch our quick video to find out why Sulphur deficiency matters so much, and what you can do to protect your crops.

 

WHICH CROPS ARE MOST AT RISK?
A wide range of crops are increasingly at risk from Sulphur deficiency, but some are more vulnerable than others, including cereals, oilseed rape and grass grown for silage. The youngest leaves are the most affected.

Clive Deeley, CF’s Regional Business Manager for the East explains: “According to the British Survey of Fertiliser Practice nearly a third of farmers still aren’t applying Sulphur to oilseed rape, and nearly half to wheat. Those farmers applying Sulphur, applied 84kg/ha SO3 to OSR and 58kg to W Wheat to achieve high yields. Our Nitrogen Sulphur products, including DoubleTop®, SingleTop®, and our extensive range of compound fertilisers, offer an excellent system to apply this well proven nutrient.”

"Nearly a third of farmers still aren't applying Sulphur to oilseed rape, and nearly half to wheat"

WHICH SOIL TYPES ARE MOST AT RISK?

Sandy soils are particularly susceptible to Sulphur deficiency, with rainfall making little difference to risk levels. But in loamy,
silty and peaty soils, higher winter rainfall levels can increase the problem.

Soil type in rainfall

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY CROPS ARE SULPHUR DEFICIENT?

In oilseed rape plants, you might notice yellowing leaves or pale flowers, but in other crops a deficiency can be harder to identify. Soil analysis isn’t always a good predictor of available Sulphur because it’s so mobile in the soil. Malate:sulphur tissue analysis can be a better indicator, looking at the ratio of malate to sulphur in the plant tissue.

WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO TOP UP MY FARM’S SULPHUR LEVELS

Different crops need different doses of Sulphur, for example 50kg SO₃/ha for cereals and 60-80kg SO₃/ha for oilseed rape. There are a variety of Sulphur supplement products on the market, and you can find out more about the best choice for your farm here.

At CF, we’ve created our DoubleTop and SingleTop granular compound fertilisers to deliver the most reliable, direct and accurate Sulphur applications available. Recent independent research by Armstrong Fisher found that paired with CF Nitram, DoubleTop performed significantly better than urea-based sulphur products, boosting margins by up to £114/ha, or £11,400 over 100 hectares.

Read more about the research study here.

FERTILISER SELECTOR